RESOURCES


 


COLLAGING UNION



A  making activity exploring union through collage on Union Street
HERE



UNION SONGS



Here are 3 mixes, loosely based around three different ideas of ‘union’.








UNION FILMS




Old Joy
by Kelly Reichardt

Two old friends reunite for a quietly revelatory overnight camping trip in this breakout feature from Kelly Reichardt, a microbudget study of character and masculinity that introduced many viewers to one of contemporary American cinema’s most independent artists. As expectant father Mark (Daniel London) and nomadic Kurt (Will Oldham) travel by car and foot into the woods in search of some secluded hot springs, their fumbling attempts to reconnect keep butting up against the limits of their friendship and the reality of how much their paths have diverged since their shared youth. Adapted from a short story by Jonathan Raymond and accompanied by an atmospheric Yo La Tengo score, Old Joy is a contemplative, wryly observed triumph whose modest scale belies the richness of its insight.



Breakwater
by Cris Lyon

A group of friends from São Paulo go on a trip to a remote beach. While they wait for the new year’s eve, they build a safe and pleasant environment through music and friendship. They take care of themselves, they own their bodies, their sexuality, their memories and they feel free.



Together
by Lukas Moodysson

Goran runs a Stockholm commune in the 1970s. The easygoing Goran does his best to keep the peace between the politically contentious people around him, many of whom are drunk or stoned on a regular basis. When Goran's sister Elisabeth (Lisa Lindgren) flees from her abusive husband, her arrival at the commune significantly changes its dynamics. Elisabeth's two children bring change, agitating for TV and meat and driving away the commune's purists as tensions spread.



Winstanley
by Kevin Brownlow and Andrew Mollo

1649. With poverty and unrest sweeping England, a group of impoverished men and women, known as the diggers, form a settlement on St George’s Hill, Surrey. Inspired by the visionary leadership of Gerrard Winstanley, the commune’s tireless, yet peaceful attempts to assert their right to cultivate and share the wealth of the common land, are met with crushing hostility from local landowners and government troops.



Sorry to Bother You
by Boots Riley

In an alternate present-day version of Oakland, black telemarketer Cassius Green (Lakeith Stanfield) discovers a magical key to professional success, which propels him into a macabre universe of "powercalling" that leads to material glory. But the upswing in Cassius' career raises serious red flags with his girlfriend Detroit (Tessa Thompson), a performance artist and minimum-wage striver who's secretly part of a Banksy-style activist collective. As his friends and co-workers organize in protest of corporate oppression, Cassius falls under the spell of his company's cocaine-snorting CEO Steve Lift (Armie Hammer), who offers him a salary beyond his wildest dreams.






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For more information, email:
williamluz@plymouthartweekender.com


‘A Pavilion For U.S.’ is a project for Plymouth Art Weekender 2020
commissioned by Visual Arts Plymouth CIC and Nudge Community Builders, with support from Arts Council England and Creative Civic Change.